Weekend Reading is a weekly rundown of our favorite stories from around the web.
Is there a story worth scoping out that we missed? Discuss this past week's headlines, and share your favorite stories from the week that was in our comments section below.

Nike's LeBron Line Finding Its Footing Again with Creativity and Collaboration
In his 15 NBA seasons, there is little LeBron James hasn't accomplished. Trophies. Rings. Respect. He's captured them all. But there is one area in which James has fumbled in recent years: the shoes.

via: Bleacher Report

Hype Can Be Manufactured and a Range of Consumer Goods Brands Want In
With this in mind, Burberry–which is in the midst of a new, and ideally, more profitable, era with the help of former Celine CEO Gobbetti and Tisci, who is famed for turning Givenchy into a modern luxury haven with street cred – will make new designs from its ever-growing B Series collection available for purchase on the 17th of each month by way of its Instagram and WeChat accounts for just 24 hours (starting at 12 pm U.K. time)–or if all goes well, until the goods sell out.

via: The Fashion Law

The Mid90s Skate Kids Always Ride Together, Onscreen and Off
That’s one of the questions lingering under the surface of Mid90s, Jonah Hill’s optimistic and heartrending first stint behind the camera as director. The film follows a tight-knit posse of teenage pals as they find their way through broken homes and empty skate shops one summer in Los Angeles in the mid-1990s. With a deft mix of summery nostalgia and hindsight, Hill creates a captivating vérité portrait of adolescent friendship, one that brims with goofy charm and the lost innocence of coming of age in a time before managing one’s brand on social media was a rite of passage into adulthood.

via: W

“Mid90s” Shows That Jonah Hill has a Bright Future as a Director
The actor who became famous as the Superbad character with a pathological need to draw penises has now made his first film as a director—and it’s quite good.

via: Quartz

Alessandro Michele, Fashion’s Modern Mastermind
In just three years, Gucci’s creative director has shifted the industry’s course, altering the way the world sees value, gender and even identity.

via: The New York Times

The Perils of Fashion's 'Fake-It-Til-You-Make-It' Culture
Underneath the veneer of happiness and success worn by many famous fashion chief executive officers and creative directors is a world of anxieties and insecurities, argues Ari Bloom.

via: Business of Fashion

How Sears' Fashion Suppliers Prepared for Its Inevitable Fall
As the original 'everything store' attempts to restructure under bankruptcy protection, most of its large apparel suppliers won’t be bleeding cash — they’ve been preparing for this moment.

via: Business of Fashion

Real Men’s Street Style Makes a Triumphant Return
Fantastic Men is a collection of images pulled from the Instagram stories of Chris Black, AKA @donetodeathprojects, printed on newsprint, and available to buy now for $15. Black’s 24-hour flicks have developed into something of a menswear micro-phenomenon, showing the cool dudes he hangs out with, snapped at a slight angle (the “Dutch tilt,” as Noah Johnson clarified). Are they fit pics? Records of the bros of downtown New York’s creative class? It’s a little bit of both and more: a hymnal for people with a natural sensibility with clothing, a throwback to the early days of street style, before brands began seeding products and people started walking back and forth like unnatural birds praying that a photographer recognizes their sneakers and legitimizes their fitspiration. Damn, I’m tearing up!

via: GQ Style

Today Is the Best Time in Fashion
Everyone in menswear seems to believe his part of the world is in decline. Ivy Style’s Christian Chensvold, for example, yearns for a preppier past, when Brooks Brothers still made proper button-downs. A Continuous Lean’s Michael Williams romanticizes a time when America still had manufacturing. The Art of Manliness’ Brett McKay is trying to revive traditional masculinity. And StyleZeigeist’s Eugene Rabkin can’t seem to find one good thing about designer fashion. For him, clothes are hurtling towards greater superficiality, hype, and crass commercialism. In a Business of Fashion op-ed about how “fashion has become unmoored and lost its original meaning,” Rabkin is so down and depressed, he can’t even get worked up about his own indictment. He dispiritingly ends his essay with: “In other words, whatever.”

via: Die Workwear!

100 Websites That Shaped the Internet as We Know It
What does a spot on this list mean? It certainly doesn’t mean “best.” A number of sites on this list are cesspools now and always have been. We’re not even sure the internet was a good idea—we’ll need another few decades before we come to any conclusions. In this case, we set out to rank the websites—not apps (like Instagram), not services (like PayPal)—that influenced the very nature of the internet, changed the world, stole ideas better than anyone, pioneered a genre, or were just really important to us. Some of these sites seemed perfectly arbitrary a decade ago and turned into monstrous destinations or world-destroying monopolies. Other sites have been net positives for humanity and gave us a glimpse of what can happen when the world works together. In many ways this list is an evaluation of power and who has seized it. In other ways, it’s an appreciation of the places that still make the web worth surfing.

via: Gizmodo

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