Weekend Reading is a weekly rundown of our favorite stories from around the web.

Glenn O’Brien’s Friends Remember a ‘Successful Maniac’
Andy Warhol hired him. Madonna sang at his 50th birthday party. He taught readers of GQ and Details how to dress. Few people have navigated New York’s tribes — art, fashion, media, music — quite like Glenn O’Brien.

via: The New York Times

Alexander Wang on Rocco Ritchie, Street Style and the Power of Youth Culture
They say the best things come in twos, but they didn't know about Adidas Originals by Alexander Wang, whose third and final drop, dropped in stores yesterday. Shot by the legendary Juergen Teller in the streets of New York, and starring a cast of the coolest kids around, including Luke Storey, Binx Walton, Lexi Boling, the much hyped Rocco Ritchie and many more. While the pics were unveiled at the end of last month, Part III hasn't been available until now. To celebrate, we caught with the creative genius himself, Mr. Alexander Wang.

via: i-D

My Desk: Rick Owens
When Rick Owens is at home in Paris, he rises at 8am, drinks a green juice prepared by his personal chef and heads to his office. The commute is short: he simply ascends the stairs of the five-storey mansion he shares with his wife and business partner Michele Lamy. Their home is located in the 7th arrondissement, an establishment neighbourhood known for government buildings, embassies and old money, and his office is a large, open space that overlooks the gardens of the Ministry of Defence – an overgrown and ever-changing view that lends a rural feel to Owens’s enclave.

via: Matches Fashion

Dior Homme's decade of dark elegance: Kris Van Assche celebrates 10 years at the helm
Darkly shrouded, sallow-faced youths skulk in the shadows, chains and spikes catching the glint of strobe lights as nu rave music reverberates. Not some edgy warehouse happening on the outskirts of Berlin, but a Dior Homme show in the Grand Palais, a grand pistachio-hued 19th-century jelly mould of a structure in the 8th arrondissement of Paris. That spectacle, the autumn/winter 2017 men’s collection from Dior Homme’s artistic director, Kris Van Assche, marked the Belgian designer’s 10th year in his current role at Dior – which by coincidence also toasted its seventh decade in January – with his anarchic anti-heroes juxtaposed against the beaux-arts building.Contrast, no?says Van Assche with a half-smile at the unexpectedness of renegade teenagers causing mayhem in Maison Dior.

via: The Telegraph

Lucie and Luke Meier Named Creative Directors of Jil Sander
Jil Sander has a new creative team. Lucie and Luke Meier, a husband-and-wife duo, have been named creative directors of the brand, effective immediately. 'We feel proud and honored to join this beautiful brand. To be able to work on this side by side makes this opportunity even more special to us. We hope to show the affection we have for this brand through our work, as Jil Sander has had such a profound influence on our paths,' they said jointly in a release.

via: Vogue

Jeff Koons’s New Line
'They touch on the metaphysical: the right here right now and its connection to the past and the future. They’re about shine, the basics of philosophy, passion, what it means to be a human, what it means to be an animal, the idea of transcendence.' That was Jeff Koons, genius or charlatan, depending on whom you talk to — an artist known for elevating children’s toys and vacuum cleaners to the stature of the Greek gods, sitting in the office area of his 35,000-square-foot studio meditating on his latest project: a multifaceted series he has been working on under conditions of the utmost secrecy for well over a year, entitled 'Masters.'

via: The New York Times

Uniqlo Wants to Be America’s Perfect Fit
Like rogue national park accounts, the Merriam-Webster dictionary, and Teen Vogue, Uniqlo recently enjoyed its time as a momentary liberal icon. The company’s perceived 'wokeness' went up tenfold when Tadashi Yanai, president of Uniqlo parent company Fast Retailing, told Trump to 'shove it.' Yanai was celebrated for coming back against the administration’s proposed tax on imports and threatening to pull Uniqlo stores from the States if the policy is put into law.

via: Racked

Uniqlo Wants to Be America’s Perfect Fit
Like rogue national park accounts, the Merriam-Webster dictionary, and Teen Vogue, Uniqlo recently enjoyed its time as a momentary liberal icon. The company’s perceived 'wokeness' went up tenfold when Tadashi Yanai, president of Uniqlo parent company Fast Retailing, told Trump to 'shove it.' Yanai was celebrated for coming back against the administration’s proposed tax on imports and threatening to pull Uniqlo stores from the States if the policy is put into law.

via: Racked

Fashion Retailers Have To Adapt To Deal With Secondhand Clothes Sold Online
I've seen the financial statements of a number of secondhand clothes stores and they're never very appealing. It's a challenging business for a number of reasons. Store rents are quite high. The quality of products depend on what people give to the store. Garments get overpriced and underpriced all the time since it's up to store personnel to judge their value. Now the business is changing. The combination of millennial customers' attitudes and the boom of online shopping are creating a threat to some retail models that isn't going away. There's a report out this morning from thredUP, a fashion resale website, that highlights what's happening in the market.

via: Forbes

Imagining the Retail Store of the Future
What will the store of the future look like? Will we be served by fleets of gleaming robots, using built-in facial recognition technology to adjust each sales pitch to a person’s current mood or past spending preferences? Will there be voice-activated personal assistants, downloading the availability, color and fit of any and every garment to your smartphone? Three-D printing stations? No checkout counters when you leave? Could there even be floating, holographic product displays on the shop floor that change when a customer walks by?

via: The New York Times

NIC GALWAY
To this lineage add Nic Galway, the British-born, German-based designer, tinkerer and innovator—who, as vice president of global design for Adidas Originals, Style, Y-3, and Core, has been the creative force behind some of the brand's most successful projects and partnerships in the new millennium. Like many of those he works with, though, Galway, 44, does not come from a fashion background. He studied cars and worked for several years in industrial design. But since landing at Adidas 18 years ago, he's brought an outsider eye to athletic wear—spearheading innovative materials, new processes, and unexpected collaborations. In 2002, he partnered with Japanese designer Yohji Yamamoto for the Y-3 collection, which is still, to this day, considered a high watermark for designer collaborations. In later years, he's overseen partnerships with Stella McCartney, Raf Simons, Rick Owens, Kanye West, Pharrell Williams, and Alexander Wang, whom he called recently to discuss collaborating, learning and unlearning, and creativity as a mind-set.

via: Interview

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