Weekend Reading is a weekly rundown of our favorite stories from around the web.

The New York We Fuck With: The Life and Times of Aimé Leon Dore Designer Teddy Santis
When I met Santis, he was holding court at a NoLiTa pop-up commemorating ALD’s recent pick-up basketball tournament. The store was marked by nothing more than a sun-bleached pair of Jordan 4s hanging above the door. Inside, Santis treated me to a tour of photographs on the wall, pictures of his childhood effects taken in a sparse, almost archeological, style: a worn leather basketball, a Sony Walkman, two black beepers, a stack of cassette tapes, an array of Krylon spray paint canisters. They read to me like cave paintings pointing to the origins of what we now call 'streetwear,' a phenomenon that Santis argues was born in New York City, just like himself.

via: SSENSE

Hypernormalisation and the Cult of Prada
One of the stories often told about Mrs Prada is that, while a student in the 1970s, she was a card-carrying member of the Italian Communist party; rumour has it she would wear Yves Saint Laurent to distribute flyers on marches (she has, on occasion, explained that she found the dress codes prescribed for such proclivities to be tiresome). It is certainly true that Prada earned her degree in political science from the University of Milan during a time in which Italy was defined by student protest and political upheaval, but she is generally reluctant to discuss that period – after all, as she once told Alexander Fury in Document Journal, 'Every young kid who was vaguely clever was leftist, so it’s not that I was so special.' Nonetheless, for her A/W17 menswear and womenswear pre-collection, that era’s aesthetic played a clear role in the designs she sent onto the runway: a combination of bookish 70s beatniks and the Red Brigades presented with somewhat sinister undertones. 'I didn’t want to do the 70s… but it came out naturally,' she said backstage. 'It was an important moment for protest, for humanity. Now, protest is very necessary.'

via: Another Mag

On Men’s Runways, Something Unexpected: Women
In Milan — home of red-blooded machismo (or as close as you can get in a men’s runway show) — there were almost as many looks for her as for him. Dsquared and Dolce and Gabbana brought women’s looks into their men’s shows for the first time — joining Prada, Moschino, Damir Doma and the behemoth of Giorgio Armani’s mainline and Emporio labels. But most telling, two of Milan’s biggest brands, Gucci and Bottega Veneta, were absent entirely. They have opted out of Milan’s men’s wear week, to show their male attire in what are otherwise women’s wear shows in February.

via: The New York Times

Opinion: What high fashion can learn from streetwear
A lot of people wonder when Vetements’ bubble is going to burst. Arguably, among the plugged-in fashion connoisseurs, it already has — but for others, the “luxe-street” obsession has only just began.

via: Glossy

Amazon is getting closer to crushing America's biggest clothing stores
The ecommerce giant is about to tap into one of America's biggest clothing trends by launching its own athleisure brand, making it a competitor to Lululemon, Gap's Athleta, Under Armour, Nike, and other top sportswear brands.

via: Business Insider

Following the Followers of Fashion
The German fashion industry has been panicking since big retailers Steilmann, Strenesse and Wöhrl went bankrupt last year. Also, purchasing is down as shoppers increasingly hunt for bargains. Industry observers like Dutch trend researcher Lidewij Edelkoort, who advises high-end brands, sees the need for real change: 'The fashion industry must redevelop everything from the ground up.'

via: Handelsblatt

Tim Coppens Storms Pitti Uomo, Talks Fast Fashion, Athleisure and Gender Ambiguity on the Runway
The German fashion industry has been panicking since big retailers Steilmann, Strenesse and Wöhrl went bankrupt last year. Also, purchasing is down as shoppers increasingly hunt for bargains. Industry observers like Dutch trend researcher Lidewij Edelkoort, who advises high-end brands, sees the need for real change: 'The fashion industry must redevelop everything from the ground up.'

via: W Magazine

Tim Coppens Storms Pitti Uomo, Talks Fast Fashion, Athleisure and Gender Ambiguity on the Runway
Men's fashion aficionados have gathered this week at Florence’s Pitti Uomo 91 fair for a first look at Fall 2017 and the big event on the calendar is Tim Coppens, who succeeds Raf Simons as guest designer. The Belgian trained at Antwerp’s Royal Academy, the same school attended by Demna Gvasalia of Vetements and Balenciaga and a long list of greats, but it was New York, not Paris, that attracted him. Coppens, 41 is a skater at heart, but he’s been designing ever since he made his first tracksuit, 'When I was like 11 or 12 on my mother’s sewing machine because I needed something to go BMXing.' The eponymous line he launched in 2011 reflects everything in his life up until now: an appreciation of beautifully cut tailoring and sportswear, a fascination for technical sport construction, late '90s skate culture and a love of the streets of New York where he’s lived for the past ten years. On Wednesday, just before his show, Coppens opened up about European versus American fashion, working for Ralph Lauren and why he's over gender ambiguity on the runway. 'That's my style. Fashion runs in cycles and people forget even faster than they used to,' he said.

via: W Magazine

Why do Instagram and Twitter want me to buy fake Yeezys?
It's not rare for me to come across ads for counterfeit goods, particularly as I'm browsing Instagram or Twitter. And although I don't have a Facebook account, I live with someone who does and know that's an issue there as well. Targeted advertising, the kind that knows exactly what brand of sneakers and streetwear I'm into, is the least of my worries here. My problem is the fact that Twitter and Facebook (which owns Instagram) are approving sponsored posts from retailers selling counterfeits. I know better, but there are many who may fall victim to these sorts of scams.

via: Engadget

5 technologies reshaping retail in 2017
It's not rare for me to come across ads for counterfeit goods, particularly as I'm browsing Instagram or Twitter. And although I don't have a Facebook account, I live with someone who does and know that's an issue there as well. Targeted advertising, the kind that knows exactly what brand of sneakers and streetwear I'm into, is the least of my worries here. My problem is the fact that Twitter and Facebook (which owns Instagram) are approving sponsored posts from retailers selling counterfeits. I know better, but there are many who may fall victim to these sorts of scams.

via: Retail Dive

Christian Dior boss: Fashion success through reinvention
Sidney Toledano is 'very pleased.' The spectacular fashion show he has just been watching has gone well. The event, staged last September in a vast hall in the grounds of the Musee Rodin in Paris, featured designs by Maria Grazia Chiuri, the new artistic director of Christian Dior, the fashion house run by Mr Toledano.
Ms Chiuri is the first woman to be the creative head at Dior.

via: BBC

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