Weekend Reading is a weekly rundown of our favorite stories from around the web.
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Kiko Kostadinov Isn’t Afraid To Put Out a Bad Collection
Kostadinov’s rise has been rapider than most, even in an era where brands blow up seemingly overnight. He is a prodigious fashion sensation in a town bursting with them (see: Martine Rose, Wales Bonner, Craig Green). Measured by sheer creative output, he’s one of the most prolific young designers anywhere: In 2015, he designed a now-legendary Stüssy capsule collection, and the next year, fresh off Central Saint Martins graduation, he debuted his eponymous mainline at London Fashion Week. Shortly thereafter, he launched a runway line for Mackintosh as the famed heritage brand’s first-ever creative director, then released his first footwear collabs with Asics and Camper. Recently, he launched the conceptual workwear brand Affix with Stephen Mann and Taro Ray. His ambition is both horizontal and vertical; when he decided it was time to launch Kiko Kostadinov womenswear, he announced the appointment of twin sisters (and fellow CSM grads) Deanna and Laura Fanning as heads, as if to establish, in a sense, the house of Kiko. As if to say: the next generation of fashion stars has already arrived.

via: GQ Style

Stefano Pilati Introduces Random Identities
Stefano Pilati, the Italian designer now based in Berlin—and former creative director of Yves Saint Laurent—has been keeping a low profile. While rumors circled about where Pilati might land next, the designer was spotted, as reported by The New York Times, attending shows and even making a surprise cameo on the catwalk, modeling for GmBH in Paris. Two summers ago, he was featured in an 18-page editorial for 032c, photographed by Lukas Wassmann, featuring Pilati’s Berlin inner circle. The city, he told the magazine, has provided him with a welcomed sense of freedom—where the designer can follow his moods and explore less limiting approaches to his life and work. Pilati’s visionary impact on the fashion world and inimitable personal style—honed and lovely, smart, and somehow cursive in its appeal—has only made his recent reticence all the more intriguing.

via: Ssense

Why Voting Is in Fashion
This election cycle, getting out the vote is not just a talking, or lobbying, point. It’s a product category.

via: The New York Times

Instagram Killed the Fashion Magazine. What Happens Now?
The photo- and video-sharing app has replaced print magazines as the primary way people discover fashion, becoming the foundation on which the industry has built everything from new labels to a $1.6 billion influencer economy. But change is coming.

via: Business of Fashion

How ‘90s Clothing Brands are Using Retro Designs to Entice Millennials
With reissues of iconic designs from their pre-Y2K heydays, brands like Tommy Hilfiger and Nautica are finding new customers who were toddlers the first time around.

via: The Wall Street Journal

Alas, the Blockchain Won’t Save Journalism After All
Hype around the technology has led to incomprehensible applications of it.

via: The New York Times

David Casavant Is More Than Just an Archivist—Peek Inside His Debut Book
Few are more successful at vibing and influencing than David Casavant, the 28-year-old archivist and collector. While still a teenager living between Signal Mountain, Tennessee, and Atlanta, Georgia, Casavant began collecting vintage Raf Simons, Helmut Lang, and Hedi Slimane pieces he scored on eBay or through other online sales. “I felt like a lone menswear fan. I used to be really good at finding things on eBay and good deals when online shopping first started for designer clothes,” he says. “It’s insane to me because when I was that age, I thought, These pieces are amazing, but there was just no one else around to talk about it with. Even when I was in college, Raf wasn’t that big of a deal. We got to work backstage at a Raf show once. I was dying and other students that went with me were just like, ‘Whatever.’"

via: Vogue

When Industry Insiders Aren’t Wearing Sneakers, This Is What They’re Wearing
We’re not saying that the writing is on the wall for sneakers or that they’ll no longer be a staple in fashion week street style sets, but suggestions are that more formal footwear could be on the comeback trail following the unprecedented rise of sneakers. We’ve seen brands such as Noah collaborate on a more formal-looking Vans Chukka MS, while Palace dropped a set of leather loafers for Spring 2018. With all that in mind, we asked some leading industry insiders to name their go-to non-sneaker footwear option. Check out the answers below.

via: Highsnobiety

The Most Common Voting Scams—and How to Get Around Them
That’s not to suggest voters should be deterred by worries about what they’ll encounter on election day—quite the contrary. “People should exercise their fundamental right to vote, they shouldn’t be intimidated either by the laws they’ve read about or by anyone or anything they encounter on the way to the polls,” says Julie Ebenstein, senior staff attorney with the ACLU Voting Rights Project. But you should know what’s being done to make voting harder and how to rectify it.

via: LifeHacker

Tapestry, One Year In
Chief executive Victor Luis talks China, challenges at Stuart Weitzman and high hopes for Kate Spade New York.

via: Business of Fashion

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